More Ray Andersons

By: John A. Lanier

Ray believed in the “Power of One” though, and so do we. One community, one organization, and even one person can have far-reaching influence beyond that which might seem possible.

Y’all have been patient with me, and trust me, I appreciate it. I haven’t heard any grumbles or seen any eye rolls. Maybe you just aren’t reading my blog anymore, but I don’t think that’s it! I’m going with just good ole’ fashioned patience.

For the last couple of months, I’ve been plugging the release of Mid-Course Correction Revisited. I’ve dedicated a blog post to explore some aspect of each chapter of the book, and I promise this will be the last one of those. Next week I’ll get into some really out-there environmental stuff (i.e. how blockchain could disrupt energy markets), but for today, I want to tap into what the final chapter of the book, Chapter 13, is all about.

Chapters 1-12 are weighty. Ray Anderson lays out a compelling vision for the prototypical company of the 21st century, and then I explore what macroeconomic trends will drive the creation of the prototypical economy of the 21st century. Chapter 13 is a bit different, with a lot less economics and a lot more warm and fuzzies.

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Pennies on the Dollar

By: John A. Lanier

In other words, fuel costs for electric vehicles kick the pants off of internal combustion engine vehicles (same goes for maintenance costs, by the way).

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Rational Hope

Dr. Hayhoe understands how important it is to walk the line between knowing the science of climate change and articulating a positive vision for the future, and she does that well. As she said in her TED Talk, “What we need to fix this thing is rational hope.”

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Queen Daenerys Targaryen the Wasteful

In a nutshell, the circular economy is about keeping materials where they have the greatest value in the flow of commerce, thereby limiting extraction of virgin materials and disposal of items in waste streams.

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The Triple Bottom Line Approach

"True triple bottom line thinking is not about doing well and doing good, but rather about doing well by doing good. Strong triple bottom line companies seek to operate in a way that creates value in all three realms simultaneously. It’s about more of all, not some of each, and it requires a business to be honest about the harms it inflicts and authentic in seeking to eliminate those harms."

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Econ 101

We need to understand both microeconomic sustainability (what it takes for a single business, like Interface, to become sustainable) and macroeconomic sustainability (what a sustainable economic system would look like).

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Revisiting Maria

Though the storm blew over a year and a half ago, Hurricane Maria has not left Puerto Rico. I’m not sure she ever will.

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Trope-a-Dope

Our goal is to inspire others to become environmentalists, working to harmonize business and society with our natural systems. Dollars certainly help in pursuit of this goal, but a compelling and authentic example of what to do, and why we should do it, is so much more valuable.

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Math Without the Numbers

Ray’s sustainability vision for Interface was for it to rewrite the IPAT equation. He believed that the harmful technologies of the first industrial revolution, extractive and polluting by nature, could be replaced by the technologies of a new, sustainability-focused industrial revolution.

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I Did a Thing

By: John A. Lanier

The thing I did was write a book. Well, the second half of a book to be more precise. My grandfather wrote the first half, which he and Interface released as Mid-Course Correction in 1998.

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