An Electric Analogy

By: John A. Lanier

That said, I’m a believer that we need to understand the fundamentals of something to change it. If we want to champion more renewable electricity, I think we should understand the difference between a kilowatt and a kilowatt-hour, if only so that we have more credibility on the topic.

I often find myself thinking about energy, specifically electricity. Electricity is so ubiquitous – I bet you’d be hard-pressed to find someone who hasn’t used an electron within the last 24-hours. Every single keystroke I hammer out is powered by the electric grid, and few things inconvenience us more than when our power goes out. Moreover, how we power our world has tremendous environmental consequences, from greenhouse gas emissions to coal ash pond accidents to siting considerations to fracked mountain ranges.

And yet, for how common electricity is in our world, I get the impression that many people would struggle to explain electricity’s fundamental units of measure. To be clear, I’m not trying to shame anyone! I even had to look it up to make sure I had it down. That said, I’m a believer that we need to understand the fundamentals of something to change it. If we want to champion more renewable electricity, I think we should understand the difference between a kilowatt and a kilowatt-hour, if only so that we have more credibility on the topic. And so, the rest of this post will by my silly use of an analogy in an effort to demystify the measurement of electricity.

Suppose that you own two dogs.* One is large, rivaling some small horses in size, while the other could fit in your backpack in a pinch. Both go bananas when it’s mealtime, but you’ve grown tired of patiently measuring their bowls of food while they bark excitedly. You’ve come up with a brilliant innovation.

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Guest Blog - Environmental Justice and the Soul of America: A Conversation with Rev. Gerald Durley

Reprinted from Drawdown Georgia's Blog

“Dr. King told us that we had to look at the soul of America. And in my estimation, the soul of America is the environment, because if you destroy the soul, then nothing else exists. If you destroy the air, if you destroy the water, if you destroy the wildlife, if you destroy the plants - that's the soul of America.” --The Reverend Dr. Gerald Durley

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A Round Red Rug

By: John A. Lanier

Genuinely, I’m quite excited to be a part of the TEDxAtlanta lineup. The theme is “Begin at the Beginning,” and I’ll be speaking about how Drawdown Georgia is a first-of-its-kind approach to reversing global warming.

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Calling All Generalists

By: John A. Lanier

I’ve come to realize just how multidisciplinary sustainability is, and to actually solve our environmental challenges, we need to become generalists.

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Climate Solutions 101

By: John A. Lanier

Just this week, Project Drawdown unveiled Climate Solutions 101, a six-part video series explaining the potential we have to reverse global warming. You better believe I will be binging these videos this week!

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Fun With Blocks

By: John A. Lanier

With photovoltaics, wildflowers under the panels, sheep grazing the grass, bee hives, and a female technician, the design is incredibly well thought-out. For my two cents, I think it looks amazing!

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I Called Bank

By: John A. Lanier

Where and how banks choose to loan their deposits determines what happens in this world of ours. Which houses get built, what colleges we go to, which jobs get created with a corporate relocation – all are enabled by the access to financing that banks offer.

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The Ethics of Environmentalism

By: John A. Lanier

If you wish everyone would compost their food waste to help mitigate climate change, then you should compost. If you wish everyone would refuse plastic straws to help keep them out of the oceans, then you should refuse plastic straws.

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Who's Your Favorite Chemist?

By: John A. Lanier

Where we often use toxic substances in our chemistry, the natural world’s chemistry is overwhelmingly benign. Where we use heat and strong forces to create chemical bonds, nature self-assembles at ambient temperatures. Where many human chemical feedstocks rely on global mining supply chains, nature has figured out how to use whatever it has right where it is.

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Corporations Can Accelerate Climate Solutions

Guest Blog by Roy Richards

Recent history tells us that achieving sustainability requires audacious goals, stair-step improvement, and collaboration with others to drive lasting change. This applies to the Drawdown Georgia goal to reduce carbon emissions by one third by 2030 as well. Share owners of private and public companies should make sure to use our investment dollars to help ensure these much-needed and highly vetted climate solutions can scale to meet Georgia’s goals.

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