In Thanksgiving for the People of Interface

I am thankful for the outstanding work of the people of Interface. They have continued that which began in 1994 with a metaphorical spear in Ray Anderson’s chest. As their latest report shows, Interface continues to lead the way in showing how an environmentally responsible enterprise should operate.

Photo Credit: Copyright Christopher Payne/Esto

Most Thanksgivings, I take the time to write a post of gratitude for this or that. This year, “this or that” is the people of Interface, the company my late grandfather founded and led for 38 years. It’s been quite some time since I have used this platform to lift up their good work, and as their most recent Environmental, Social, and Governance Report shows, there is a lot to celebrate!

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Bottle Deposit Bills and the New Technology That Can Make Them Work

By: John A. Lanier

Several states in America utilize bottle deposits and refunds to incentivize higher recycling rates for plastic bottles, glass bottles, and aluminum cans. The data around recycling rates in those states suggest that these mechanisms work pretty well, and technologies like reverse vending machines can help make them even better. It’s a model we need to see adopted in more places.

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Ray Anderson's Predictions For the Future: Where Are We Now?

By: John A. Lanier

In an award acceptance speech in 2010, Ray Anderson made some interesting predictions about the future. Twelve years later, we realize that he "nailed it" in so many ways.

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By: John A. Lanier

In the wake of Hurricane Ian’s devastating impact, some people might want to jump to the conclusion that climate change caused the storm. As the scientific community has taught us, that’s the wrong conclusion to make. Instead, we can say that climate change is making hurricanes like Ian worse, especially when it comes to the challenges of extreme rainfall and flooding.

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Is Patagonia the Rabbit or the Duck: Why It’s Okay to Answer “Both”

By: John A. Lanier

I take a deep-dive into exactly how Yvon Chouinard gave away his ownership of Patagonia earlier this month. To me, the details matter, and they show that he was both acting philanthropically and in a way that minimized his tax liability. For that, I applaud him.

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Unpacking the Latest Heat Wave in the West

By: John A. Lanier

The recent heat wave that struck California and other parts of the west highlights how big of a challenge these weather events already are. As climate change worsens, so too will heat waves. That’s bad news for humans, and it’s bad news for the stability of our electric grids.

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Crying Uncle: Ecocentricity Shifting to an Every-Other-Week Blog

By: John A. Lanier

After eight years of writing this blog weekly, I’ll be downshifting a bit. That will hopefully result in even better blogs when I do write, and at the very least, it will let me focus on other efforts we have ongoing at the Ray C. Anderson Foundation.

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Shifting the Burden of Proof: Why It’s Now On the Fossil Fuel Industry to Defend Itself

By: John A. Lanier

After many decades of research and advocacy, the climate movement has carried its burden of proof in showing how detrimental the fossil fuel industry has been. It’s now time for the fossil fuel industry to justify its role in our future economy, and I don’t think it looks good for them.

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Revisiting Our Climate Solution Set: The Latest from Project Drawdown

By: John A. Lanier

Climate is in the news right now, which seems like the perfect time to revisit Project Drawdown’s trailblazing work in modeling our most effective climate solutions. In their latest update, we get 11 new solutions and some other updates that might surprise you.

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Sailing the Salish Sea, And Why We Should Think Carefully About the Salmon We Buy

By: John A. Lanier

My wife and I had an amazing experience off the coast of Vancouver, and it was an experience that taught me a lot about an endangered species and how the salmon we buy contributes to the problem.

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